Dr Assaf Givati

Assaf Givati

Senior Lecturer

Phone: 023 92 844418

Email: assaf.givati@port.ac.uk

Biography

I am a Senior Lecturer in Health Science and Public Health at the School of Health Sciences & Social Work. I grew up in Kibbutz Ein Gedi on the shore of the Dead Sea. After a career as a naturopathic practitioner in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, I completed Masters in Public Health (MPH) at Maastricht in the Netherlands between 2002 and 2003 before joining the University of Portsmouth in 2004. In 2012 I completed my doctoral thesis on the professionalization of non-medically qualified acupuncturists and homeopaths in the United Kingdom.

Research projects

Training paramedics in Higher Education in England, a decade on The aim of this research study is to evaluate the impact of Higher Education paramedic education on paramedic practice in England and explore the challenges to this process (qualitative interviews and focus groups). To be presented at the International Sociological Association conference in Vienna, July 2016.

Acupuncture, Science and Higher Education: negotiating competing paradigms and professional autonomy within British universities The aim of this research study is to explore the negotiation of biomedical and traditional acupuncture knowledge and claims as part of the teaching of traditional acupuncture within (or accredited by) British universities (qualitative interviews and focus groups). To be presented at the International Sociological Association conference in Vienna, July 2016.

Localising the field: a comparative analysis of acupuncture and homeopathy training in Portugal and the UKTogether with Joana Almeida from Royal Holloway, UOL (sociology): the role of the local political-societal circumstances in shaping the regulation of Complementary and Alternative medicine practice (Documentary analysis). To be presented at the Sociology of Professional Groups conference at the University of Aveira, Portugal, September 2016.

Publications

Givati A. (2015). Performing ‘pragmatic holism’: professionalization and the holistic discourse of non-medically qualified acupuncturists and homeopaths in the United Kingdom. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine 19 (1), 34-50.

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Givati A & Hatton K. (2015). Traditional acupuncturists and higher education in Britain: the dual, paradoxical impact of biomedical alignment on the holistic view. Social Science & Medicine 131, 173-180.

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Bradley T & Kirmani N. (2015). Religion, Gender and Development in South Asia. In Tomalin E (Ed.) The Routledge handbook of religions and global development. London and New York: Routledge.


Longman C & Bradley T (Eds.). (2015). Interrogating harmful cultural practices: gender, culture and coercion. London: Ashgate.


Bhatewara Z & Bradley T. (2013). ‘The people know they need religion in order to develop’: religion’s capacity to inspire people in Pune’s slums. European Journal of Development Research 25 (2), 288-304.

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Bradley T, Pallikadavath S. (2013). Dowry and women’s lives in Kerala: what has changed in a decade? Contemporary South Asia, 21 (4), 444-461.

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Bradley T. (2011). Women, Violence and Tradition: Taking FGM and other practices to a secular state. London: Zed Press.


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