Professor Sherria Hoskins

Sherria Hoskins

Interim Dean of Science

Phone: 023 9284 6321

Email: Sherria.hoskins@port.ac.uk

Biography

I completed a BSc (Hons) in Psychology and Pg Dip in Psychological Research Methods in the Psychology Department at the University of Plymouth and was awarded a PhD bursary at the same university. I graduated with a PhD in learning and teaching in March 1999.

I worked as a Research Assistant at the Human Assessment Laboratory at the University of Plymouth, then progressed my career as an Educational Consultant for Plymouth University's Educational Development Services. Subsequently I became lecturer on an open access flexible learning psychology degree, in the Educational Studies Department at University of Surrey, then worked as a Senior Research Fellow examining predictors of achievement in nationally examined professional courses (funded by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development).

In 2004 I was awarded a University of Portsmouth Teaching and Learning Fellowship for my contribution to teaching and learning and in 2013 I was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship by the Higher Education Academy (HEA). In 2014 I became a Principal Fellow of the HEA. I was promoted to Professor and interim Dean of Science at the University of Portsmouth in June 2016, where I am project supervisor teaching Level 5 Individual Differences, Psychometrics and Employability.

Research projects

Research interests include the social cognitive approach to understanding learning behaviour (e.g. resilience, readiness for change, decision making) and achievement. I am specifically interested in what impacts learners’ self-theories (e.g. Implicit Theories of Intelligence and self-efficacy) and the effect of these on learning outcomes. I lead ‘Growing Learners’, a group of education research psychologists, who work directly with schools them to improve their pupils’ aspirations, expectations and attainment using evidence based practice.

Publications

To see all research outputs please click here